Oct 04, 2022  
2018-19 Catalog 
    
2018-19 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


As you read through the course descriptions, notice that each entry contains the course prefix and number, course title, a brief description of the course, prerequisite information, credit hour value, number of lecture and laboratory hours per week scheduled in a traditional 17-week semester, and the Program Classification System (PCS) code, described below. Note that some courses are assigned an IAI code. A description of the Illinois Articulation Initiative (IAI) is also presented.

An official course syllabus for credit courses is available upon request.

Program Classification System (PCS) Coding

PCS codes indicate the degree or certificate for which courses will be accepted.

PCS 1.1 Baccalaureate/Transfer Courses
  Academic courses equivalent to lower-division baccalaureate study and are generally articulated for transfer to four-year universities.
   
PCS 1.2 Occupational/Technical Courses
  Technical and applied courses designed to meet the requirements for an occupational degree or certificate program. Although these courses are not generally designed for transfer, some may be articulated with universities and used to meet lower-division baccalaureate requirements.
   
PCS 1.3 Community Education Courses
  Non-credit courses.
   
PCS 1.4 Remedial/Developmental Courses
  Preparatory or developmental educational courses designed to develop basic skills in reading, writing, speaking, and mathematics of high school graduates or persons achieving the equivalency of a high school diploma. Course credit does not count toward the completion of the associate transfer degrees.
   
PCS 1.6 Vocational Skills
  Short-term vocational skills training or upgrading courses that are designed to be used toward the completion of a vocational skills credential. Vocational skills courses may be used toward occupational/career degree or certificate if the college determines that the content of the course meets the objectives required.
   
PCS 1.7 Adult Basic Education
  Courses designed to provide basic skills training up to the eighth grade equivalency level for non-high school graduates.
   
PCS 1.8 Adult Secondary Education
  Courses designed to provide basic skills training for the secondary equivalency level for non-high school graduates.
   
PCS 1.9 English As A Second Language
  Courses that include instruction in English for those students whose native language is not English. Courses are designed to include various levels of competencies based on proficiency and purpose.

Illinois Articulation Initiative (IAI) Coding

IAI codes for specific L&C courses that have been accepted by the IAI are listed in parentheses following the course title. For example, ENGL 131 First Year English I (IAI: C1 900). C1 900 refers to the IAI General Education Communications Writing Course Sequence I. This code is a common code used by participating institutions to refer to courses very similar to ENGL 131.

C = Communications which includes specific English and speech courses
M = Mathematics which includes specific math courses
P = Physical Sciences which includes specific chemistry, physical sciences, and physics courses
L = Life Sciences which includes specific biology courses
H = Humanities which includes specific foreign language, humanities, literature, and philosophy courses
F = Fine Arts which includes specific art, drama, and music courses
HF = Interdisciplinary which includes specific humanities courses
S = Social and Behavioral Sciences which includes specific anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology courses

For more information, visit www.itransfer.org.

 

Dental Assisting

  
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    DENT 144 - Dental Materials

    (Fall Semester Only)
    Introduces the student to the physical properties, manipulations, and applications of dental materials used in taking impressions, constructing study casts, and formulating restorative materials and replacing or protecting structures within the oral cavity. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Dental Assisting Program.
    (PCS 1.2, 3.5 credit hours - 2.5 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)
  
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    DENT 148 - Dental Specialties

    (Spring Semester Only)
    Studies theoretical and practical implementation of the following dental specialties: oral maxillofacial surgery, orthodontics, endodontics, prosthodontics, periodontics, and pediatric dentistry Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Dental Assisting Program.
    (PCS 1.2, 2 credit hours - 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab)
  
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    DENT 150 - Dental Radiology

    (Fall Semester Only)
    Includes the theoretical principles and biological effects of radiation. Stresses correct methods of exposing, processing, and mounting intraoral and extraoral radiographs for diagnostic purposes. Includes principles of digital and extraoral radiography, and radiographic interpretation. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Dental Assisting Program.
    (PCS 1.2, 3 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)
  
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    DENT 152 - Preventive Dentistry

    (Spring Semester Only)
    Elaborates on the causes and treatments of dental caries and periodontal disease with emphasis on diet, nutrition, and proper home care; stresses the role of preventive dentistry through fluoridation, caries etiology tests and plaque control techniques; includes information on dental public health and school-based dental health programs. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Dental Assisting Program.
    (PCS 1.2, 2 credit hours - 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab)
  
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    DENT 153 - Operative Procedures

    (Fall Semester Only)
    Emphasizes dental office infection control and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) guidelines. Also includes the importance of proper chair-side dental assisting techniques and procedures in operative and specialty areas and maintenance of dental instruments and equipment. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Dental Assisting Program.
    (PCS 1.2, 3 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)
  
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    DENT 154 - Clinical Practice

    (Spring Semester Only)
    Assigns students to various cooperative training experiences including general dentistry, dental specialties, and the Southern Illinois University-School of Dental Medicine. Weekly seminars provide the student with the opportunities to discuss extramural activities and allow for preparation of National Boards. Prerequisite(s): C or better in the following: DENT 131, DENT 134, DENT 136, DENT 144, DENT 150, and DENT 153.
    (PCS 1.2, 5 credit hours - 1 hour lecture, 20 hours lab - 320 hours must be worked)

Dental Hygiene

  
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    DENT 231 - Pharmacology

    (Spring Semester Only)
    Provides knowledge of therapeutic agents used in dentistry and the mechanisms of drug action in the body, enabling students to comprehend the manifestations of drug administration in dental hygiene. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Dental Hygiene Program.
    (PCS 1.2, 2 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    DENT 232 - Pathology II

    (Fall Semester Only)
    Includes information on pathology, inflammation, immunity, and repair, with special emphasis on the gingiva and periodontium; prepares the dental hygiene student to detect and record abnormal findings. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Dental Hygiene Program.
    (PCS 1.2, 2 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    DENT 233 - Nutrition And Oral Health


    Provides the fundamentals of general nutrition with emphasis on the interrelationship between nutrition and oral health. Examines current, relevant topics specific to different life stages and states of health. Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: Admission to Dental Hygiene Program and a grade of C or better in BIOL 141, BIOL 142, CHEM 130, DENT 231, and DENT 232.
    (PCS 1.2, 2 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    DENT 234 - Preclinical Dental Hygiene I

    (Fall Semester Only)
    Introduces the student to instrumentation principles and skills essential to dental hygienists in patient assessment and treatment. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Dental Hygiene Program.
    (PCS 1.2, 5 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 9 hours clinical)
  
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    DENT 248 - Periodontology

    (Spring Semester Only)
    Studies historical development; includes histologic and clinical characteristics of periodontal diseases; normal, pathological, and etiological considerations are discussed; current research in different types of therapy are applied to clinical practice. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Dental Hygiene Program.
    (PCS 1.2, 2 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    DENT 250 - Dental Hygiene Clinic Seminar I

    (Spring Semester Only)
    Provides instruction in advanced dental hygiene skills, including periodontal examinations, radiograph interpretation, ultrasonic scaling, air abrasive polishing, and sulcular irrigation techniques; emphasis is on analysis and decision making in periodontal assessment and treatment planning. Prerequisite(s): DENT 234 with a C or better.
    (PCS 1.2, 3.5 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 4.5 hours lab)
  
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    DENT 251 - Dental Hygiene Clinic Seminar II

    (Summer Only)
    Introduces the dental hygiene student to the oral needs of the following patients: mentally challenged, physically challenged, the patient with psychiatric disorders, the geriatric patient, the pregnant patient, the patient with cardiovascular disease, and the cleft lip/palate patient. Special emphasis is placed on the recall/maintenance phase of dental hygiene care. In addition, the topics of margination/overhang removal and hypersensitivity will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): C or better in DENT 250.
    (PCS 1.2, 2 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    DENT 252 - Community Oral Health

    (Spring Semester Only)
    Studies concepts of health education and promotion, community dental health and public health dentistry; and assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation of community oral health programs. Prerequisite(s): Admission to Dental Hygiene Program.
    (PCS 1.2, 2.5 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab)
  
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    DENT 253 - Dental Hygiene Clinic Seminar III


    Introduces the dental hygiene student to the oral needs of patients with: sensory disabilities, endocrine disorders, respiratory diseases, transmissible diseases, cancer, organ transplants, musculoskeletal disorders, dental implants, central nervous system disorders, blood disorders, autoimmune disorders. Special emphasis is placed on the treatment needs and the recall/maintenance phase of dental hygiene care. In addition, the topics of nutritional counseling, bleaching techniques, alternative fulcrums, written and clinical board examination preparation and how to prepare a dental hygiene portfolio for opportunities in dental hygiene will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): C or better in DENT 251.
    (PCS 1.2, 2 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    DENT 254 - Dental Hygiene Practice II

    (Spring Semester Only)
    Provides instruction in advanced dental hygiene skills including oral examinations, radiograph interpretation, ultrasonic scaling, air abrasive polishing, and sulcular irrigation techniques. Emphasizes analysis and decision making in periodontal assessment and treatment planning. Prerequisite(s): C or better in DENT 234.
    (PCS 1.2, 4 credit hours - 0 hours lecture, 10 hours lab)
  
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    DENT 255 - Dental Hygiene Practice III

    (Summer Only)
    Builds knowledge and competence in dental hygiene practice. Provides the student with patient care experiences that correlate with, and allow application of, dental hygiene procedures and lecture/lab concepts. Prerequisite(s): C or better in DENT 254 or permission of instructor.
    (PCS 1.2, 6 credit hours - 0 hours lecture, 15 hours lab/clinic)
  
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    DENT 256 - Dental Hygiene Practice IV

    (Fall Semester Only)
    Provides information for students to gain competency in dental hygiene care and prepares students for the transition to practice. Prerequisite(s): C or better in DENT 255 or permission of instructor.
    (PCS 1.2, 6 credit hours - 0 hours lecture, 15 hours lab)
  
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    DENT 257 - Local Anesthesia In Dentistry


    Provides instruction on pain management of the dental patient through the use of local anesthesia. Includes head and neck anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, medical emergencies, and the clinical technique. Prerequisite(s): C or better in DENT 254 and permission of instructor.
    (PCS 1.2, 2 credit hours - 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours clinical)
  
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    DENT 295 - National Board Exam Review


    Reviews topics in dental hygiene to prepare candidates for the National Board Dental Hygiene Examination, required to obtain dental hygiene licensure in all states. This course includes an organized plan for review of all topics on the exam, including scheduled sample exams on these topics. Pass/Fail grades may be given. Prerequisite(s): Enrolled in last semester of dental hygiene courses or graduated from a dental hygiene program.
    (PCS 1.2, 3 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    DENT 299 - Clinical Skills Update


    Provides clinical remediation to currently enrolled or graduate dental hygienists for review of and enhancement of dental hygiene clinical skills. A self study, one-on-one plan is developed which will enrich knowledge and skills above that offered in the dental hygiene core curriculum. Emphasis is placed on identification of clinical skill level, development of remediation schedule and knowledge and skill through repetition. This course is repeatable three times; it shall be one to five credit hours each time the student successfully completes the course. The total number of credits that will apply to general education vocational skills certificate shall be four to twenty credits. Prerequisite(s): Current dental hygiene student or graduation from an accredited dental hygiene program.
    (PCS 1.6, 1-5 credit hours - 0 hours lecture, 2-10 hours clinical)

Drafting and Design

  
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    DRFT 131 - Fundamentals Of General Drafting


    Introduces drawing equipment, theory, materials, and instruments employing basic sketching techniques and lettering, includes geometric constructions, basic dimensioning, section views, auxiliary views and isometric drawings. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.2, 3 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 140 - Computer Aided Drafting


    Introduces the theory of drafting utilizing freehand sketching and computers and CAD software. The basic areas of geometric construction, orthographic projection, section views, and basic dimensioning will be studies along with the basic operations of computer aided drafting software. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.2, 4 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 142 - Engineering Graphics I


    Covers the drafting procedures required to find graphical solutions for engineering problems. Involves the use of descriptive geometry’s primary and secondary auxiliary views, creating intersections utilizing orthographic projection, and pattern development procedures. Prerequisite(s): DRFT 140.
    (PCS 1.2, 4 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 144 - Engineering Graphics II


    Covers the complete graphical documentation process required for product design and manufacturing. Includes the advanced dimensioning, thread representations and labeling, and drawing requirements of the current ASME Y14.5 Drafting Standards. Prerequisite(s): DRFT 140.
    (PCS 1.2, 4 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 145 - Fundamentals Of Microstation CAD


    Introduces the use of MicroStation CAD software, following all basic operating parameters to produce basic drawings. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.2, 4 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 146 - AutoCAD


    Studies fundamentals in the operations of AutoCAD software. Starts with the basic commands and operations and advances through complete drawing production using plotting or printing equipment. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.2, 3 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 147 - Structural, Civil & Pipe Drafting


    Introduces the student to fundamental operations and requirements to produce drawings in the structural, civil, and piping areas. The three areas will be studied individually with a final overview of how they all work together to produce the required documents for large construction projects. This course provides the fundamental background required to help students make career choices in which field they would prefer to study in more detail. Prerequisite(s): DRFT 140.
    (PCS 1.2, 4 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 151 - Guitar Design and Construction


    Provides an introduction to guitar design using Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math (STEAM) principles. Topics include research, conceptualization, computer-aided drafting (CAD), manufacturing, assembly, and finishing of a prototype guitar. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.2, 3 credit hours - 1 hour lecture, 4 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 231 - Piping And Structural Drafting


    Studies actual industrial drafting problems emphasizing specifications and standards of structural, piping, and piping layouts. The factors in pipe design involving fluid flow, pressure and temperatures are utilized. Prerequisite(s): DRFT 140.
    (PCS 1.2, 4 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 238 - Civil Engineering Drafting


    Presents the fundamentals of Civil Drafting as it relates to land development, property design, topographical and profile layouts, and road concepts. Basic CAD software and specialized Civil programs will be used for all drawing production. Prerequisite(s): DRFT 140 or DRFT 145.
    (PCS 1.2, 4 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 239 - Land Surveying


    Introduces the theory and practice of measurements employing survey equipment. Traversing by transit. Stadia methods, topography, horizontal, vertical, spiraled curves, determination of meridian, land surveying methods. Prerequisite(s): MATH 116 or MATH 16B or MATH 125.
    (PCS 1.2, 3 credit hours - 1 hour lecture, 4 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 248 - Advanced Computer Aided Drafting


    Continues advanced study of DRFT 140. Course content will begin with system management and customizing and continue through parts compiling to 3D construction from 2D drawings. Prerequisite(s): DRFT 140.
    (PCS 1.2, 4 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 249 - Topics In CAD I


    Consists of the advanced study and the extensive laboratory use of the CAD system in the different drafting fields. Specialized projects will be drawn using the CAD system. This course is repeatable three times. The amount of credit awarded shall be two credit hours each time the student successfully completes the course. The total number of credits that will apply to a degree shall be eight credits. Prerequisite(s): DRFT 140 or DRFT 145.
    (PCS 1.2, 2 credit hours - 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 250 - Topics In CAD II


    Offers a second class in the CAD utilization of the different fields of drafting. Special projects will be assigned in the field of the student’s choice to be constructed on the CAD system. Pictorial construction of the assessments will also be studied. This course is repeatable three times. The amount of credit awarded shall be two credit hours each time the student successfully completes the course. The total number of credits that will apply to a degree shall be eight credits. Prerequisite(s): DRFT 140 or DRFT 145.
    (PCS 1.2, 2 credit hours - 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 251 - Product Design And Development


    Involves the design of a product from conception to the final productions of a prototype model. Students will utilize all of the documentation procedures learned in the preceding drafting courses and learn the basic industrial operations and management concepts involved in design and manufacture of commercial products. Prerequisite(s): DRFT 253 and minimum of two drafting elective courses.
    (PCS 1.2, 4 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 253 - Introduction to 3D Parametric Design


    Presents the operation and theory behind true “Solids Modeling” using the most recent modeling software. Software operation and theory will be studied while producing mechanical parts in the solid format. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.2, 4 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 254 - Advanced Inventor


    Presents students with techniques in solid modeling. Students develop skills in creating advanced models using parametric design software. The models are then physically created for verification and analysis using the Stratsys rapid prototyping machine. Prerequisite(s): DRFT 253.
    (PCS 1.2, 4 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 256 - Advanced Solidworks


    Introduces creation of solid models using Solidworks. Students develop skills in creating parts, assemblies, drawings, and animations using Solidworks software. Prerequisite(s): DRFT 253.
    (PCS 1.2, 3 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 261 - Machine Component Applications


    Covers design of mechanical assemblies utilizing standard machine components such as gears, cams, levers, and linkages. Standard procedures and practices will be utilized during the design process. The methods for manufacturing such as fixtures, clamping methods, sheet metal bending, forming, and blanking will also be included. Prerequisite(s): DRFT 142 and DRFT 144.
    (PCS 1.2, 4 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)
  
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    DRFT 270 - Drafting Instruction Internship


    Provides an internship where the student is placed in a district high school drafting classroom to assist the lead teacher in the daily classroom activities of teaching a drafting/CAD curriculum. This course is a variable credit course. Prerequisite(s): DRFT 142 and DRFT 144 and either DRFT 140 or DRFT 145 and approval of the Drafting/CAD coordinator.
    (PCS 1.2, 2 credit hours - 0 hours lecture, 10 hours lab - 160 hours must be worked.)
  
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    DRFT 271 - Drafting/CAD Internship


    Provides a work-based learning experience in the field of drafting. Students gain an understanding of the requirements and expectations in their career field. Prerequisite(s): DRFT 248.
    (PCS 1.2, 2 credit hours - 0 hours lecture, 10 hours lab - 160 hours must be worked.)

Directed Study

  
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    DST 130 - Experiential Learning Assessment


    Assists learners in identifying, articulating, and documenting learning acquired outside the traditional classroom and relating that learning to a career goal. Includes the development of a portfolio containing an autobiographical and chronological narrative essay describing specific areas of learning and verifying documentation. This course is repeatable three times. The amount of credit awarded shall be two credit hours each time the student successfully completes the course. The total number of credits that will apply to degree electives shall be eight credits. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.1, 2 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    DST 299 - Directed Study


    Focuses study on a specific subject area under faculty direction. Prospectus is required and credit given only on completion of a satisfactory project, report, or examination. This course is a variable credit course. Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory completion of 30 hours of baccalaureate-oriented course work, at least three credit hours of “B” or higher in the specified discipline, and permission of instructor.
    (PCS 1.1, 1-4 credit hours - 1-4 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)

English as a Second Language (Adult Education)

  
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    EASL 101 - English As A Second Language I


    Provides basic instruction in listening, speaking, reading, writing and spelling of English for persons whose native language is not English. The course content is such that the student is expected to gain increased depth of knowledge and skill through repetition. This course is a variable credit course and is repeatable nine times. The amount of credit awarded shall be up to nine credit hours each time the student successfully completes the course. The total number of credits that will apply to the certificate shall be 36 credits. Prerequisite(s): Oral placement test administered by instructor.
    (PCS 1.9, 0.5-9 credit hours - 0.5-9 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EASL 102 - English As A Second Language II


    Provides intermediate instruction in listening, speaking, reading, writing and spelling of English for persons whose native language is not English. The course content is such that the student is expected to gain increased depth of knowledge and skill through repetition. This course is a variable credit course and is repeatable nine times. The amount of credit awarded shall be up to nine credit hours each time the student successfully completes the course. The total number of credits that will apply to the certificate shall be 36 credits. Prerequisite(s): Oral placement test administered by instructor.
    (PCS 1.9, 0.5-9 credit hours - 0.5-9 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EASL 103 - English As A Second Language III


    Provides advanced instruction in listening, speaking, reading, writing and spelling of English for persons whose native language is not English. The course content is such that the student is expected to gain increased depth of knowledge and skill through repetition. This course is a variable credit course and is repeatable nine times. The amount of credit awarded shall be up to nine credit hours each time the student successfully completes the course. The total number of credits that will apply to the certificate shall be 36 credits. Prerequisite(s): Oral placement test administered by instructor.
    (PCS 1.9, 0.5-9 credit hours - 0.5-9 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)

Ecology

  
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    ECOL 101 - Plant Growth & Development


    Introduces the biological principles underlying plant growth and development with emphasis on their application to sustainable practices and greening. Topics include plant structure, anatomy, and growth as affected by light, temperature, water, soil characteristics, and plant nutrition. Laboratory exercises emphasize environmental factors and permit detailed observation of plant growth. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.2, 3 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)
  
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    ECOL 102 - Plant Reproduction


    Explores natural and artificial propagation techniques, reproductive patterns, plant selection methodologies, and harvesting using knowledge of plant structure to improve students’ understanding. Advanced plant identification, plant care, annual and perennial plant comparisons, growing site design, layout and budgets are covered. Focus is on effective utilization and preservation of environmental resources, and the prevention of damage to growing sites and offsite land, water, and air resources. Hands-on experience is emphasized. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.2, 3 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)
  
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    ECOL 124 - Careers in Green Industry


    Provides participants with a pragmatic approach to developing and managing their career pursuits in the Green Industry. General topics include market structure, career management, business case profiles, professional networking guidance, acquiring credentials, industry software overview, and introductory environmental economic principles. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.2, 2 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    ECOL 131 - Introductory Soils

    (IAI Major: AG904)
    An introduction to the chemical, physical, and biological properties of soils. Covers fundamentals of soil origin and formation as well as biological, chemical, and physical properties. Discusses essentials regarding key properties of soil such as texture, structure, moisture, and reactions. Provides experience in methods of soil testing. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.1, 4 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)
  
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    ECOL 132 - Intro to Restoration Ecology


    Provides students with a basic understanding of the principles and practices of restoration ecology. Reviews ecosystem concepts and their significance to ecological restoration, and discusses the importance of planning in the restoration process. Explores various techniques commonly used for restoring different types of ecosystems, and visits to local restoration projects will be included. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.1, 3 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    ECOL 134 - Native Plants in the Landscape


    Provides knowledge about the sustainable use of native plantings in both large- and small-scale landscape construction. Covers a broad array of topics including local ecology, plant adaptations, identification, classification, restoration ecology, and landscape design. The course will be of interest to students pursuing a degree in natural sciences, horticulture, or ecology as well as naturalists and landscape professionals. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.1, 3 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    ECOL 238 - Field Practicum

    (Spring Only)
    Applies advanced methods and skills for ecological and environmental field technicians. Students will get advanced, hands-on instruction and experience in a variety of required and useful skills for a field technician. This course involves outdoor activity, lifting, strenuous activity, and instruction in field and industrial settings. Prerequisite(s): C or better in BIOL 138 and C or better or concurrent enrollment in ECOL 271.
    (PCS 1.2, 2 credit hours - 1.5 hours lecture, 1 hour lab)
  
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    ECOL 271 - Internship


    Provides students the opportunity to obtain further knowledge and skills related to the field of restoration ecology through a planned and supervised paid or unpaid experience. Students will gain practical work experience and apply what has been learned in the classroom to actual work situations. This course is a variable credit course. Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 33 total semester hours of Restoration Ecology program courses and a GPA of 2.00 or better and permission of program coordinator.
    (PCS 1.2, 1-4 credit hours - 0 hours lecture, 5-20 hours lab - 80 hours must be worked for each credit hour granted)

Economics

  
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    ECON 131 - Introduction To Economics

    (IAI: S3 900) (Fall Semester Only)
    Studies evolution of economic systems, history of economic thought and current economic theory. For students seeking an overview of economics. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.1, 3 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    ECON 151 - Principles Of Macroeconomics

    (IAI: S3 901)
    Explores the evolution of economic systems, modern economic theory including fiscal and monetary theory and institutions, international trade, current economic problems, and comparative economic systems. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.1, 3 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    ECON 152 - Principles Of Microeconomics

    (IAI: S3 902)
    Explores components of U.S. economy; supply and demand analysis; theories of consumer, firm, and government behavior; market structures; and current economic problems. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.1, 3 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)

Training For Educators

  
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    EDTR 140 - Your Emotions and Communicating


    Prepares individuals currently employed or seeking employment with the essential communication skills necessary in achieving career, and personal excellence. Studies the issues employees face when communicating within or outside of their organization. Focuses on the five areas of emotional intelligence: self-awareness, self-control, self-motivation, empathy, and effective relationships. Examines a wide range of communication situations through analysis of the four communication styles based on Carl Jung’s archetypes (Senser, Thinker, Feeler, Intuitor) to improve productivity and personal success in the workplace. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 0.5 credit hours - 0.5 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 200 - Orientation For L&C Staff


    Focuses on understanding the College policies, procedures, and practices staff members must follow. Includes, but is not limited to, step-by-step instructions on using services such as BlazerNet/WebTime, and information on College communication systems, employee conduct, and student learning. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 1 credit hour - 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 201 - Orientation For Adjunct Instructors


    Focuses on understanding the general College practices part-time instructors must follow. Includes, but is not limited to, step-by-step instructions on using such services as Blackboard and BlazerNet, and information on College communication systems, academic protocols, and student learning. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 1 credit hour - 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 205 - Using Social Media


    Studies the application of social media and interactive online tools to engage students and allow them to take ownership of their educations and become active knowledge makers. Explores tips and tricks allowing teachers to enhance their curriculum via social media and other free, online resources. The resources are designed to aid both teachers and students. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 1 credit hour - 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 221 - 3P Grading System


    Examines the 3P Grading System and develops a grading system to be used in one’s class. Introduces ideas of self-assessment and the elements of the 3P Grading System. A central focus will be on ways to modify the system to make it discipline and course-specific. To allow focus on a different element of the 3P grading system each semester, the course may be repeated up to three times for a maximum of four credit hours. Pass/Fail grades will be given. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 1 credit hour - 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 222 - Examining Teaching Practices


    Examines the elements that make up a positive learning environment for students, and introduces the participant to a variety of best practices in the following areas: how students learn, teaching strategies, organization and structure of class, class preparation techniques, faculty treatment of students and evaluation of students. Pass/Fail grades will be given. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 2 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 223 - The Learner’s Brain


    Examines the current research on brain based learning combining neuroscience, education, and psychology. Active learning techniques will be emphasized. Students will be introduced to a variety of brain based research in several different areas including mindset, meditation and mindfulness, resilience, information processing, and the concept of transfer. Students will also be introduced to some of the basic tenants of brain based learning including basic brain anatomy, brain plasticity, mindset, social and emotional learning, the role of trust and safety, authentic learning opportunities, the role of effort in learning, the biology of learning, the role of stress and sleep on learning and memory, and how to integrate these concepts into our daily classroom routines and activities. This course is repeatable three times. The amount of credit awarded shall be one credit hour each time the student successfully completes the course up to a maximum of four credit hours. Pass/Fail grades will be given. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 1 credit hour - 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 224 - Integrating Reading


    Trains instructors in the practice of guiding students in reading for transfer level courses. Initial focus will be on developing instructors’ background information about reading and learning. The course will help instructors set reading goals while identifying strengths and weaknesses in reading. Instructors will identify, develop, and integrate positive reading techniques into their courses. This model is designed to ensure that faculty have hands-on practice as well as reading guides that they can use in their classroom as they progress through the course. The course emphasizes the concept of “action-looping” which involves the application of lessons learned in this course to instructors’ transfer level courses with the overall goal of improvements in transfer level courses in terms of reading assignments and overall comprehension. This course is repeatable three times. The amount of credit awarded shall be one credit hour each time the student successfully completes the course for a maximum of four credit hours. Pass/Fail grades will be given. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 1 credit hour - 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 240 - School Management


    Studies the issues principals face in managing elementary and secondary schools. Topics and format will vary. This course is repeatable three times to allow students to focus on specific management issues affecting schools. The amount of credit awarded shall be one credit hour each time the student successfully completes the course up to a maximum of four credits. Pass/Fail grades will be given. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 1 credit hour - 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 250 - School Districts: Legal Environment


    Studies the ongoing legal changes that are faced by school districts. Topics and format will vary. This course is repeatable three times to allow students to focus on specific legal issues affecting school districts. The amount of credit awarded shall be one credit hour each time the student successfully completes the course up to a maximum of four credits. Pass/Fail grades will be given. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 1 credit hour - 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 251 - Classroom Assessment Techniques


    Empowers classroom teachers to effectively use Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) in order to develop a better understanding of the learning process in their own classrooms. This course is an introduction to Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) and the Teaching Goals Inventory (a Cross/Angelo Model). Classroom Assessment Techniques are implemented and results presented as part of a research project report. This course is repeatable three times. The amount of credit awarded shall be one credit hour each time the student successfully completes the course for a total of four hours. Pass/Fail grades will be given. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 1 credit hour - 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 259 - Course-Level Assessment


    Trains instructors in the principles and practices of course assessment using a course assessment model that is designed to ensure continuous course-level learning improvement. This process meets the learning assessment guidelines of the Higher Learning Commission, as well as the College’s own commitment to ongoing assessment within the context of continuous improvement. The course emphasizes the concept of action-looping which involves the applying of lessons learned through assessment to make improvements in the course. Pass/Fail grades will be given. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 2 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 260 - Teaching For Critical Thinking


    Examines the idea of critical thinking from a number of points of view. Introduces the participant to the common models of critical thinking. With this orientation established, the course further develops one model, that of Richard Paul, in greater detail. The central concepts of the course are critical thinking, critical thinker, reasoning, metacognitive processes, active vs. passive learning, elements of thought, and intellectual standards. These are discussed in the context of discipline-specific courses. Pass/Fail grades will be given. The course may be repeated three times for a maximum of four credit hours. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 1 credit hour - 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 261 - Assessing Oral Presentations


    Assists instructors in assessing oral presentations as a course activity. The course examines use of oral presentations as learning tools and the elements of effective presentation. Participants will use a standardized rubric/evaluation instrument to assess oral presentations resulting in common understanding. Participants will be asked to share data with the lead instructor for General Education Speaking Assessment. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 1 credit hour - 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 262 - Assessing Writing


    Assists instructors in assessing writing assignments as course activities. The course examines the use of writing as a learning tool and the elements of effective writing. In the course, participants will use a standardized rubric to assess writing assignments, resulting in common understanding. Participants will be asked to share data from their own classroom writing assessment with the lead instructor for the General Education writing assessment. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 1 credit hour - 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 266 - Implementing Blackboard Learn


    Focuses on the understanding and implementation of Blackboard 9 Learning System to reorganize already existing courses in the Bb 9 environment. Hands-on experience with using the different tools, such as content, discussions, quizzes, messages, grade center, will be offered. This course is repeatable three times to provide students an additional instructional opportunity due to the technological complexities of this new instructional delivery system. The amount of credit awarded shall be one credit hour each time the students successfully completes the course. The total number of credits that will apply to the program electives shall be four credits. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 1 credit hour - 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 267 - Our Mississippi Educational Guide


    Discusses the Mississippi River as a vital natural resource and provides innovative and creative ways to teach fifth and sixth grade students about the river and its surrounding areas. Each workshop provides formal and nonformal educators with a comprehensive overview of Our Mississippi as well as practical, training in its implementation. Group discussion and hands-on practice will provide educators with the background information and experience they will need to integrate interdisciplinary Our Mississippi educational activities into their existing programs. Participants will receive the Our Mississippi Educational Activities guide and all materials needed during the workshop will be provided. Emphasis will also be placed on active, experiential, inquiry-based learning and real-world problem solving. The amount of credit awarded shall be one half credit hour. Pass/Fail grades will be given. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 0.5 credit hours - 0.5 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 268 - Learner Centered Instruction


    Defines and presents active learning instructional strategies and discusses why active learning strategies are instructionally important to maximize student learning. Converging evidence from multiple research and practice sources indicates that listening to a classroom lecture is not an especially effective way to promote deep and lasting student learning. Commonly mentioned obstacles to using active learning instructional strategies will be discussed along with strategies to overcome these obstacles. Acknowledging that trying any new instructional approach entails some risk, faculty will learn how to use some low risk active learning instructional approaches as well as some high risk active learning instructional approaches. After the initial workshop, faculty will be challenged to engage in brief, low-risk and high-impact activities that students can complete before the follow-up workshop. This course is repeatable three times. The amount of credit awarded shall be one credit hour each time the student successfully completes the course up to a maximum of four credit hours. Pass/Fail grades will be given. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 1 credit hour - 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 269 - Professional Learning Communities


    Introduces the fundamental concepts of a Professional Learning Community as an approach to continuously improve instruction and student performance. Evidence from schools as well as the research community points to these structures and practices as making an immediate improvement in student achievement. The structure starts with a group of teachers who meet regularly as a team to identify essential and valued student learning, develop common formative assessments, analyze current levels of student achievement, set achievement goals, and then share and create lessons and strategies to improve upon those levels. Pass/Fail grades will be given. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 2 credit hours - 2 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 270 - Water Education for Teachers


    Increases educator knowledge about aquatic issues and education techniques through the instruction and use of an interdisciplinary educational resource guide. Each workshop provides formal and nonformal educators with access to and instruction of the Project WET (Water Education for Teachers) Curriculum. Group discussion, peer-teaching activities, and hands-on practice will provide educators with the tools to incorporate water education into their programs. Pass/Fail grades will be given. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 0.5 credit hours - 0.5 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 271 - Stream Monitoring and Water Quality


    Provides students with the materials and knowledge to do a habitat and biological survey on a wadeable stream to assess water quality trends. Emphasis is placed on stream ecology and macroinvertebrate identification, as well as hands-on stream sampling, so participants will be competent to independently perform a RiverWatch/Stream Discovery survey. Participants will receive macroinvertebrate identification cards, a stream monitoring manual, and access to stream monitoring kits to be used in a stream survey. Pass/Fail grades will be given. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 0.5 credit hours - 0.5 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 279 - Program-Level Assessment


    Introduction to the principles and practices of program assessment using a process model that is designed to ensure continuous program improvement. This process meets the requirements of the ICCB’s mandatory five-year Program Review as well as the College’s own commitment to ongoing assessment within the context of continuous improvement. The course emphasizes the concept of “action-looping” which involves applying the lessons learned through assessment to make improvements in the program. This course is repeatable three times. The amount of credit awarded shall be one credit hour each time the student successfully completes the course for a total of four hours. Pass/Fail grades will be given. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 1 credit hour - 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 280 - HEV Technology Training


    Covers Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) safety, battery systems, internal combustion engines, drive systems, power electronics, and hybrid supporting systems. Course prepares students and/or practicing technicians for ASE L3 certification examination. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 1 credit hour - 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 286 - Infusing Humanities In Curriculum


    Provides ideas of how to potentially include/incorporate Diversity Council and Humanities programming in a course’s semester curriculum. Programs will vary each term. Group discussion and provided resources will enable faculty participants to create actual lesson plans and student assignments. This course is designed to be repeatable to allow faculty to study additional instructional opportunities within the Humanities. Topics will vary each semester. The course may be repeated three times for a maximum of two credit hours. The amount of credit awarded shall be one half credit hour. Pass/Fail grades will be given. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 0.5 credit hours - 0.5 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 287 - Improv For Educators


    Teaches Spolin-style improvisational theater fundamentals, activities, and techniques for use by higher education instructors. Students will use improv and theater games to develop effective communication skills, efficacy, mindfulness, classroom management skills, and reflexive teaching skills. Students will also learn improvisational theater activities for use in their own classrooms to help college students improve creativity, personal accountability, concentration, organizational skills, verbal and nonverbal communication skills, comprehension and listening skills. Improv techniques will emphasize student engagement and differentiated instruction and appeal to multiple intelligences and learning styles. Pass/Fail grades will be given. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 1 credit hour - 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDTR 290 - Tutor Training


    Introduces tutors to the role and methods of effective tutoring. They will learn to establish goals and objectives, implement a tutorial plan, apply effective learning skills, develop effective communication and listening skills, and foster critical thinking. In addition, they will develop an understanding of the educational resources available to them. This course focuses on tutoring principles found universal to effective tutoring across different disciplines and settings. Because these principles are flexible, each tutor will be applying them in practice to his or her own discipline, exploring and adapting strategies as they suit specific tutoring situations. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.6, 1 credit hour - 1 hour lecture, 0 hours lab)

Education

  
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    EDUC 230 - Education Observation Lab


    Provides students the opportunity to complete 25 pre-professional field-experience hours required by the Greenville College Teacher Education dual admission program. Students will be assigned to observe a classroom teacher to complete the field-experience hours in selected schools and classrooms. Students will be required to document their classroom experiences. Prerequisite(s): EDUC 231 or concurrent enrollment.
    (PCS 1.1, 1 credit hour - 0.5 hours lecture, 1 hour lab - 25 hours observation)
  
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    EDUC 231 - American Education


    Note: students must have a favorable background check during the first two weeks of class as it is required for placement in all Illinois schools. Introduces education through consideration of the history and philosophy of American education and expectations and beliefs society and individuals hold for it today. Introduces trends and issues in curriculum, instruction, school organizations, teacher-learner processes, and careers in education. Fifteen hours of field experience required. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 132 or concurrent enrollment; concurrent enrollment in EDUC 230 recommended.
    (PCS 1.1, 3 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDUC 232 - Introduction To Special Education


    Surveys the historical, philosophical, and legal foundations of special education. Topics include characteristics of learners with special needs and the programs that serve them under various laws, especially the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Emphasizes identification of students with exceptionalities and appropriate accommodations and modifications useful for educational planning in both regular and special education settings. Thirty hours of field experience required. Prerequisite(s): C or better in EDUC 231; concurrent enrollment in EDUC 233 recommended.
    (PCS 1.1, 3 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDUC 233 - Cultural Awareness In The Classroom


    Explores cultural issues that impact the classroom environment, race and social class issues, poverty, and how to teach students the “Hidden Rules”. Students will search for effective strategies to better meet the needs of underserved populations. Students will reflect on case studies and discuss ways of teaching the skills needed to access power within our society while preserving cultural backgrounds. Research-based information will be presented on being a role model, providing support and discipline, building professional relationships, and discussing why culture really counts when teaching children of poverty. Students spend 40 hours assisting in a classroom that serves a high minority and/or low socioeconomic population. Additional topics including brain-based research and teaching and learning styles to foster student learning will be covered. Prerequisite(s): Cumulative GPA of 2.5 required and C or better in EDUC 231; concurrent enrollment in EDUC 232 recommended.
    (PCS 1.1, 3 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDUC 234 - Preparing for the TAP


    Designed to prepare prospective teachers to take and pass the Test of Academic Proficiency (TAP) by refreshing and/or improving skills and abilities in reading, writing, and mathematics. Prerequisite(s): Students must have basic computer skills; C or better in ENGL 131 and MATH 116 or MATH 16B.
    (PCS 1.1, 1-3 credit hours - 1-3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDUC 235 - Differentiated Instruction


    Introductory course on foundations of instructional planning for differentiated instruction. Includes research on instructional methods appropriate for a diverse and inclusive classroom. Prerequisite(s): C or better in EDUC 231; concurrent enrollment in EDUC 233 recommended.
    (PCS 1.1, 3 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    EDUC 241 - Educational Psychology


    Examines psychological concepts and principles as applied to educational problems and situations. Emphasizes cognitive, social, ethical, physical and emotional factors as a means of promoting growth, learning, and adjustment of children. Introduces statistical concepts related to student testing and assessment, and the different means of facilitating and supporting student learning in the classroom. Prerequisite(s): C or better in PSYC 131.
    (PCS 1.1, 3 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lecture)

Electronics

  
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    ELTN 131 - Fundamentals Of Electricity


    Covers electricity, including voltage, current, resistance, series and parallel circuits, power, magnetism, inductance and capacitance. Study of circuits containing passive elements such as resistors, capacitors, inductors and transformers. Includes AC and DC fundamentals. Prerequisite(s): MATH 112 or MATH 12B or placement by exam.
    (PCS 1.2, 4 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)
  
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    ELTN 144 - Digital Circuits


    Covers the use of digital integrated circuits in logic systems and electronic circuits. Circuits covered include logic gates, latches, counters, registers decoders, and memory systems. Prerequisite(s): ELTN 131 or concurrent enrollment.
    (PCS 1.2, 4 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)
  
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    ELTN 180 - Communications Cabling


    Introduces students to electrical characteristics, installation, termination, and testing of wires and cables commonly encountered in a technical environment. Emphasizes safety when working with electricity and fundamental principles of electricity. Prerequisite(s): None.
    (PCS 1.2, 3 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    ELTN 253 - Microprocessors


    Studies hardware and software operations of the Intel 80x86 family of microprocessors, emphasizes programming and interfacing. Students should be familiar with DOS. Prerequisite(s): ELTN 144 (or concurrent enrollment) and either CNET 131 (or concurrent enrollment) or CIS 135 (or concurrent enrollment).
    (PCS 1.2, 4 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Emergency Medical Technician

  
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    EMT 120 - Emergency Medical Technician


    Studies medical, legal, and ethical issues, basic anatomy and physiology, patient assessment, and treatment of medical and trauma emergencies. Also includes ambulance operations and basic hazardous materials awareness. Successful completion qualifies the student to challenge the state or national examination for licensure as “Emergency Medical Technician.” Note: to take the state or national exam, individuals are required to possess a high school diploma or equivalent. Prerequisite(s): Health Care Provider CPR card from either American Heart Association, American Red Cross, or American Safety and Health Institute. FIRE 135 (or concurrent enrollment), FIRE 139 (or concurrent enrollment), and must be coenrolled or demonstrate successful completion of required National Incident Management System (NIMS) online classes.
    (PCS 1.2, 7 credit hours - 4 hours lecture, 6 hours lab)
  
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    EMT 120A - Emergency Medical Technician


    Studies medical, legal, and ethical issues, basic anatomy and physiology, patient assessment, and treatment of medical and trauma emergencies. Also includes ambulance operations and basic hazardous materials awareness. Successful completion qualifies the student to challenge the state or national examination for licensure as “Emergency Medical Technician.” Note: to take the state or national exam, individuals are required to possess a high school diploma or equivalent. Prerequisite(s): Health Care Provider CPR card from either American Heart Association, American Red Cross, or American Safety and Health Institute. FIRE 135 (or concurrent enrollment), FIRE 139 (or concurrent enrollment), and must be coenrolled or demonstrate successful completion of required National Incident Management System (NIMS) online classes.
    (PCS 1.2, 7 credit hours - 4 hours lecture, 6 hours lab)

English

  
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    ENGL 031 - First-Year English I Support


    Introduces reading and writing skills necessary for the successful completion of ENGL 131 and other college courses. Emphasizes writing skills to give students experience using the writing process with focus, elaboration, and organization, as well as organizing materials and thoughts in written summaries and oral presentations. Illustrates steps readers can take before, during, and after reading to increase comprehension and retention. This course may be repeated one time for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 131.
    (PCS 1.4, 3 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    ENGL 037 - Technical Writing Support


    Supports students in practicing the reading and writing skills needed for successful business writing. The reading focus will be on pre-reading, reading for meaning, and evaluating progress. The writing focus will be on the writing process with a special emphasis on organization, elaboration, and revision. This course may be repeated one time for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 137.
    (PCS 1.4, 3 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
  
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    ENGL 108 - Basic Language Skills I


    Introduces writing skills to give students experience using the writing process with focus, elaboration, and organization. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Supported College Transition Program.
    (PCS 1.4, 3 credit hours - 3 hours lecture, 0 hours lab)
 

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